Emergency Preparation

 

 

Emergency Preparations

 

 

 

 

By Nate Richardson

A Member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

Available free at RichardsonStudies.com

Contact editor@richardsonstudies.com

 

 

Table of Contents

 

Chapter Food Storage. 2

Chapter Self Defense Firearm Comparisons. 3

Chapter Firearm Training Tips    transfer note. 6

Chapter Joel Skousen. 7

Chapter Basic Preparations Lists pending find. 8

Chapter Destroying Angel Pass By: On The Word of Wisdom, & End Time Plagues. 9

Preparedness Tip: Run for Your Life by Andrew Skousen. 11

Chapter: Notes on AHA’s CPR Training. 13

Chapter Lessons from The Jews on Quickly Relocating. 14

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter Food Storage

 

Chapter Self Defense Firearm Comparisons

Keep your family safe by having firearms and a concealed carry permit. The permit is easy to get, and the firearms are still available.

 

Where to buy:

Wikiarms.com has lists of vendors and their stock.

Ready Gunner in Orem Utah.

Discount Firearms in Springville Utah.

Sportsman’s Warehouse Surplus for military gear online.

 

9mm handguns small enough for concealed carry:

Note on magazine size: Note that with any of these you can typically buy after market magazines with greater capacity. However, those with greater magazine capacity listed here will easily fit in your holster as such, but not with the extended magazines. You should have a few extra extended magazines for any firearm.

 

Glock Brand:

Glocks have few moving parts, making it easier to maintain, and less likely to jam.

Glocks have a trigger safety in addition to the drop safety.

All generation 5 Glocks are ambidextrous.

Glock 19: Most of the employees at the Ready Gunner store say they conceal carry a Glock 19. The Glock 19 is the “Honda Civic” of concealed carry firearms. These cost

Glock 43x is a slimmer firearm, but still 9mm. The magazine holds 12 rounds. It’s an improvement upon the Glock 43, which didn’t fit a hand well and only held 6 rounds.

Sig Saur Brand:

These are not ambidextrous.

These have more moving parts than a Glock.

These have a drop safety, but no trigger safety.

 

SigSaur 365 is quite small, and therefore easy to conceal. The magazine is single wide but still holds 12 rounds. The SigSaur 320 is similar but with a double wide magazine holding 16 rounds, and is the new military issue firearm.

 

Smith & Wesson Brand:

 

 

 

Other noteable hand guns of a different caliber:

Smaller guns don’t absorb the kick as much, so they can be harder for petit users. When it comes to a 9mm, it’s simply a lot of power, more than some can handle. A 380 is the in between caliber. It’s easier to fire, but still stronger than a 22 handgun, which wouldn’t knockdown an intruder.

380 handgun:

22 handgun: It has low knockdown power, but it’s more threatening when granny pulls this out than when she simply begs for mercy.

 

Shotguns:

These are effective for home defense as they don’t require great aim, and they have high knock down power against close up and medium range intruders. Its point and shoot, and works even for the novice.

The 12 gauge is the typical shotgun for self-defense.

The OO ammo is recommended for home defense.

The shorter barrel will be easier to manipulate in small spaces, but is less accurate long range, which is typically fine for home defense.

 

Rifles:

These are needed for hunting but can serve to keep unwanted visitors away as well.

The 22  rifle is easy to start learning with, and is good for pests.

 

Assault Rifles:

Don’t bring a knife to a gun fight; or a semi-auto to an auto fight. The second amendment is about defending against tyranny, so bring whatever they will, namely an assault rifle.

The AK-47 is the flagship assault rifle.

 

 

 

 

Chapter Firearm Training Tips transfer note

 

Chapter Joel Skousen

 

The weekly World Affairs Brief by Joel Skousen brings keen analysis of current events, and a weekly preparedness tip. He teaches of the secret combinations which so few are willing to expose.

He has several books including Strategic Relocation, The Secure Home, & 10 Packs for Survival. He is a foremost expert in the field of preparation.

 

Chapter Basic Preparations Lists pending find

 

Chapter Destroying Angel Pass By: On The Word of Wisdom, & End Time Plagues

 

Joel Skousen suggests that the last days plagues will be man made. With the Corona virus scandal of 2020 we can see how easily this can happen.

I don’t think that the word of wisdom is limited to avoiding diabetes and cancer from not using toxic substances and using healthy foods.

Viral infections are known to not effect those who have healthy immune systems.

By keeping our health in order, we can highly decrease the odds of our succumbing to the increasingly potent last days plagues.

Joseph Smith taught that it is a mistaken idea to think that the saints will avoid all of the plagues and desolations of the last days, due to the weakness of the flesh.

Joel Skousen pointed out the irony in the seeking of the word of wisdom blessings of run and not be weary and walk and not faint, if we never walk, and we never run! The human body was designed to run. We should have some amount of intense training on a regular basis to train our bodies to function at the optimum level.

Further, the connections of spirit and body cannot be denied. Surely God would have us take care of our bodies. The soul is a two part system of the spirit and body.

Avoid vaccination. A healthy immune system is the best security against viral disease. President Nelson took the vaccine but didn’t say it was required to do so. We each decide what is best for our health. I don’t trust the vaccines due to the mysterious things they put in them, and the steep agenda pushing them from the deep state.

I also believe in avoiding psychotropics and antidepressants, as these can have an effect of numbing the conscience. They will not always be available, and we should work towards emotional independence where possible.

A major issue in the standard American diet (SAD) is that we eat far too much meat. The saints are not exempt from this trend! Seventh Day Adventists however do quite well in this, and studies show they are far healthier than the average person. Asians were the healthiest before they Americanized can started eating tons of meat, now they’re not much healthier than anyone else. Even if you chose to have some amount of animal products in your diet, if you’re like everyone else (which is highly probable by definition), you need to dramatically decrease your meat consumption. Meats should be for small flavoring, not main dishes. Studies are clear in showing that those who consume higher amounts of animal products have many more health issues.

 

 

Preparedness Tip: Run for Your Life by Andrew Skousen

 

From the World Affairs Brief, 3-22-19 worldaffairsbrief.com

 

How many of us feel fit enough to make a “run for it” if we had to? How many of us would be panting hard after just one block? What if our path of escape was uphill? Keeping ourselves physically fit has many benefits, including the ability to get out of a tough situation by simply running away. Don’t underestimate this crucial aspect of mobility. Although we have plenty of fast vehicles and modes of transportation, nothing is as flexible and always available as our own two feet. On foot we can rapidly change direction, clamber over obstacles, climb and even swim. Our aptitude in this area could not only save our own life, but help us get to others in time to save them. Here are some ideas for improving in this core area of physical fitness.

 

Start slow. The best speed and agility comes from a foundation of healthy physical fitness. If you are starting from very little daily exercise and activity, it pays to start small and work up to higher levels of fitness. Even patients with recent operations are now being encouraged to get up and walk afterwards because their improvement is much faster when they do. Walking is fine, but don’t stagnate at this level. Walking hills or stairs next strengthens the heart and helps the lungs get stronger when you get to breathing hard.

Transition to running. Most people can run, even if they have to start slow. Many people just avoid it because they find it too strenuous at first. The key is to avoid this sudden all-or-nothing approach. Our bodies are complex and take time to adjust to different benchmarks. When we suddenly ask it to perform at a faster speed it struggles to keep up the pace and fills our minds with painful complaints from our lungs to our knees which aren’t used to it. Some people hate running because of this or think they can’t do it. But most of the time it is just that their bodies are not used to it or they have developed bad running habits that exacerbate knee or joint problems. Learn first proper running technique such as from this excellent video by Dr. Mark Cucuzella. The key is to help your body transition from your current benchmark to one where you can run, and run fast.

 

Interval training. An excellent way to nudge your body toward faster movement is with intervals of more intense effort interspersed between slower periods where you are still moving. For instance, if you are used to walking, switch to a jog for one minute and then back down to walking for 3 minutes. Start with the speed you are used to running and speed it up for a short period of time before resuming the slower pace until you recover. Use a watch to time your intervals and increase the times spent at the faster pace and/or decrease the time spent at the easier pace. Gradually the body will adjust your muscle tone, blood flow and energy stores to be ready for the faster pace. Don’t give up just because it is hard at first; that’s the signal needed to tell your body to change.

 

The goal is to increase both speed and stamina. To improve your stamina, intersperse intervals of slower running or walking into your routine before you get tired out. For instance, if you can only run for a half mile, try walking a bit after just a quarter mile, again after a half mile and then run on to increase your distance. You will soon find that you can keep this up for 1, 3, 5 and more miles just by pacing yourself with periodic walking. Eventually you can even run those distances without the walking breaks.

 

Once you have a stronger foundation of physical health, you can add speed days to your workouts. The goal here isn’t to be able to run your whole workout at top speed but to run several intervals at high speed after getting warmed up with 10 to 15 minutes of normal running. The 100 yard dash is too short for a real get-away, but it is useful for learning to quickly cover short distances. You can measure it off precisely if you want to compare your time with others, but most people can just sprint for the length of the same city block and compare their time as they improve. To really get away you will likely have to run for two or three blocks, so practice that or use the 1/4 mile track for an excellent test of both speed and stamina.

 

Don’t be discouraged if you can’t beat your old high school records. The goal is to get to your peak fitness for your current age. For some people that means just being able to climb a hill or several flights of stairs unassisted, but most of us are capable of some form of running. Experts have long known that the body was designed to run, and most of us just need to remind it of its abilities. In the end, the goal of being able to move quicker in an emergency is an additional benefit of healthier physical fitness from exercise and healthier eating. Keep working at it and you can become more vibrant, efficient and capable of quick action when you need it most.

Don’t forget to lose weight if you need to. Running will never become enjoyable if you carry around an extra 30 or 40 pounds when exercising. Remember too, when exercising to help lose weight, don’t increase your food intake, with your increased appetite. Most will not lose weight while exercising if you keep eating the same type and quantity as before. You must cut down on food intake to be successful. [END]

 

 

Chapter: Notes on AHA’s CPR Training

Based on American Heart Association CPR Training

2018

 

100-120 compressions per minute.
2 inches deep compressions, not more than 2.4, most people don’t go deep enough.
Stop compression for breaths for less than 10 seconds.
Need bare chest.
Carry pocket knife so can cut clothes.
30 compression then 2 breaths.
For breaths watch chest rise
Hold mask in c shape with 1 hand other hand lift chin.
Keep a bag valve mask handy.
If heart rate returns but no breathing, give 2 breaths every 5 seconds.
Place aed pads one above right breast other on left side of torso, should be labeled.
Have a razor to shave chest hair.
If have 2 sets of pads try one with hair and shave if aed says not connected then place the new set on.
Not place aed pad over med pad or heart monitor implant.
Anyone over age 8 use adult aed pads.
Infant CPR use thumbs to do 1.5″ compressions.
Infant compression to breaths 15:2.
Mouth to mouth must plug their nose.
Cardiac arrest give 2 breaths but just 1 for respiratory arrest.
Baby choke can hit back just between shoulders 5x then 5 chest compression if not conscious, 5 stomach thrusts if conscious.
Adult Heimlich if pregnant or too day do the thrusts over chest instead of abdomen.

 

 

Other medical field basics can be quickly learned. The Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) textbook is mostly fluff and textbook-ism, don’t count on it as an effective learning tool.

 

 

Chapter Lessons from The Jews on Quickly Relocating

 

Fiddler on the Roof depicts how the Jews had to be ready to leave at the drop of a hat. They were almost used to leaving their homes in a moments notice.

The movie depicts them being given 3 days’ notice to sell what they can, pack up, and leave.

Of course you can’t really sell anything in 3 days, so don’t plan on that.

Do you have fuel to leave the state? To travel to the other half of the country? To go pick up a loved one in need from an area in crisis then return home?

Having a full year of fuel for your commute is perhaps unreasonable but start small.

Have alternative travel methods too, such as bikes horses ATVs and even a sort of hand carts.

Have packs for survival ready to go. See Joel Skousen’s “10 Packs for Survival” booklet.

Most of your food storage will not be travel friendly but have packs for the alternative need to leave home.

Where possible have vehicles which can haul trailers which each adult (or at least skilled youth) in the family can drive. Have enclosed trailers for each vehicle.

You may not be able to be ready for everything but be ready for some basic travel needs.

Of course, have passports on hand as well.

Paint masks from a hardware store can be much more effective than N-95 masks to have on hand for when real danger exists outside.

 

 

 

 

Chapter: Consecrated Finance

 

 

Use your means not to constantly and lavishly recreate, nor to excessively hoard. Rather use your time learning and serving God modestly. Yes have a year of financial reserve so you don’t lose your home in a crisis, but get away from the money obsessed culture we live in.

 

– “If we are to build that Zion of which the prophets have spoken and of which the Lord has given mighty promise, we must set aside our consuming selfishness. We must rise above our love for comfort and ease, and in the very process of effort and struggle, even in our extremity, we shall become better acquainted with our God.

Let us never forget that we have a marvelous heritage received from great and courageous people who endured unimaginable suffering and demonstrated unbelievable courage for the cause they loved. You and I know what we should do. God help us to do it when it needs to be done, I humbly pray in the name of Jesus Christ, amen.” (https://www.lds.org/general-conference/1991/10/our-mission-of-saving?lang=eng President Hinckley, Conf. Report Oct. 1991 Our Mission of Saving)

-The focus is honest focus on the gospel and all that entails.

-study as guided by the Lord (even if he tells you to be a finance major etc.)

-continuing education in the highest form may be outside of the official school’s; this is not to discourage those with opportunity for these degrees, but we live in a special day when the boy who pushes the plow may know more from books than the doctors and scholars.

-be willing to live a humble life.

-people need to be helped spiritually as much as temporally

-Zion is (very) often referred to as the poor. We can, at least, be poor in heart, not having our heart on riches, regardless of how much riches we have.

-people get to where they are struggling to provide for family and hence not in politics (and other important social or religious or family issues) much, but the worst is when we are working for recreational vehicles etc. and using that as the reason why we aren’t involved. Heaven forbid!

-Dan E Christensen, in his book “The birth of the Kingdom of God The destruction of America” he speaks of how we are obsessed with planning our retirement etc. and use Sabbaths to worship the God of NFL and other sporting leagues.

-we should work 6 days a week like God’s commanded (“six days shalt thou labor”) and not worry about getting out of it!

-Joseph Smith is one of the greatest men who ever lived (D&C 135:3). Jewish texts suggest that the 7 heads of dispensations are the 7 archangels, and the 7 angels whom will pour out the plagues of God upon the earth at the last days. That great archangel dispensation head Joseph Smith worked only enough to eke out a meager living, then spent the rest of his time studying languages ancient texts re-discovering history etc. to help his people and find his way to God. We can be like him and not be afraid but trust in God.

-by and large, those who serve God are delivered from the trials of the last days, not necessarily those with the most money. “The summer is past, and my soul is not saved” they will may say.

-President Monson our prophet has on several occasions quoted Shakespeare in King Henry the VIII,

“O Cromwell, Cromwell!

Had I but served my God with half the zeal

I served my king, he would not in mine age

Have left me naked to mine enemies. “

-while retirement may be alright from our occupations, we must continue to work for God. “Now, a word to us seasoned brethren: retirement is not part of the Lord’s plan of happiness. There is no sabbatical or retirement program from priesthood responsibilities—regardless of age or physical capacity. While the phrase “been there, done that” may work as an excuse to avoid skateboarding, decline the invitation for a motorbike ride, or bypass the spicy curry at the buffet, it is not an acceptable excuse for avoiding covenant responsibilities to consecrate our time, talents, and resources in the work of the kingdom of God.” (President Uchtdorf, “Two Principals for any Economy” Gen Conf. Oct. 2009 https://www.lds.org/general-conference/2009/10/two-principles-for-any-economy?lang=eng).

-Don’t be obsessed about having a house of your own. “And Jesus saith unto him, the foxes have holes, and the birds of the air have nests; but the Son of man hath not where to lay his head.” (Matthew 8:20).

-when it comes to finances, we should not put our lusts in higher priority than what the Holy Ghost tells us what to do. What’s right for one person financially could be wrong for another. Some things are more solid like avoiding debt, but other things are more flexible like what a person does for their career (though they must provide for their family or they are worse than infidels and deny the faith (1 Tim. 5:8)

-prophets have taught that if we don’t find time for 30-60 minutes of scripture study a day, we have our priorities wrong and need to humble ourselves and re-prioritize.

 

Take a look at these two situations of what is going on in the world of poverty and foolish use of wealth:

 

 


 

“I’m not like other people. I don’t eat every day.” – Les Misérables, as depicted in the 1998 Film

Elder Richard J. Maynes, at an April 2017 at a Stake Conference in Utah I attended shared some interesting thoughts on poverty:

  • 1/100 people in the world have a college education; 12/100 people have more than 1 pair of shoes; ½ people have clean drinking water;
  • These numbers are even smaller when you look back further in history. So, you see, we think we are in the middle of the ladder, and focus on those ahead of us, but really, we in America today are second from the top, and we only focus on the rung above us.
  • Many don’t worry about international travel, but about whether they have enough to get on the bus to go in to town. Yet those people find happiness despite their lack of possessions.
  • They can wear the same shirt every day of their lives and still be happy.

 

 

Now lets look at some extreme weal of our times. Here are some highlights from the book “Richistan: A Journey Through The American Wealth Boom & The Lives of the New Rich” by Robert Frank, published about 2008.

 

 

– “Richistanian” is the name he uses to refer to this new type of people

-Has a good deal to say about how some treat wealth differently and

– the shift from national elitists to global elitists.

– the 500-foot boats.

– how often 18 cents of every dollar given to major charity groups goes to the charities, as well as some wealthy people trying to correct that.

-The other part goes toward the private schools of the children of the people who run the charities.

– mentalities of the children who grow up in homes with wealth, and how some parents choose to have their children work for everything.

– the wealthy being same made now as compared to inheritance of the old rich.

– the economic boom we’ve been seeing where it’s not about being a millionaire anymore but about billionaire.

– how they give to charity balls then throw their own charity balls and expect everyone to give to those, and how it’s more about finance than charity.

– people who work 16-hour days, consuming their entire lives with seeking and finding material wealth.

– ignoring natural disasters while people shop for boats.

– how the wealthy are republicans, but the super wealthy are democrats.

– the extensive training butlers receive to perform the ballet of service. Speaks of how the wealthy all feel like to be financially secure, they need double of what they have.

– 4 levels of wealth: 1-10 million, then 10-100 million, then 100 million-1 billion, then multibillionaires. Speaks of their envy of each other.

– people who always work while on vacation and send emails through the night and during watching films.

– support groups for rich people where they speak about their problems

– a wealthy man seeking to reclaim his family and having good success by having Saturday morning breakfasts with his daughter.

– how even the wealthy often live beyond their means

– how it’s fast to get rich today, but also fast to lose it all

– how they don’t consider themselves rich usually

– how they live in fear of poverty

– one wealthy family who spends its summers in 3rd world countries to help the people there and see what their real needs are.

– applying business skills to charity groups

 

 

 

Chapter Financial Stability as Taught by the Prophets

 

 

 

-“…a religion which has not the power to save people temporally and make them prosperous and happy here, cannot be depended upon to save them spiritually, to exalt them in the life to come.” (Joseph F. Smith; “The Truth about Mormonism,” Out West magazine, Sept. 1905, 242.; also quoted by Joseph B Wirthlin in April 1999 Conf. Report “Inspired Church Welfare”  https://www.lds.org/general-conference/1999/04/inspired-church-welfare?lang=eng)

 

-“When this people are prepared to properly use the riches of this world for the building up of the Kingdom of God, He is ready and willing to bestow them upon us. I like to see men get rich by their industry, prudence, management and economy, and then devote it to the building up of the Kingdom of God upon the earth.” (Brigham Young, Journal of Discourses, Volume 2, 114-115; also quoted by Franklin D. Richards “The Law of Abundance” in Conf. Report April 1971:https://www.lds.org/general-conference/1971/04/the-law-of-abundance?lang=eng)

-“What are riches for, then? To be used in doing good. Therefore, let us dedicate our means to the building of the kingdom of God.” (Franklin D. Richards “The Law of Abundance” in Conf. Report April 1971:https://www.lds.org/general-conference/1971/04/the-law-of-abundance?lang=eng)

-“But seek ye first the kingdom of God, and his righteousness; and all these things shall be added unto you.” (Matthew 6:33)

-“But before ye seek for riches, seek ye for the kingdom of God. And after ye have obtained a hope in Christ ye shall obtain riches, if ye seek them; and ye will seek them for the intent to do good—to clothe the naked, and to feed the hungry, and to liberate the captive, and administer relief to the sick and the afflicted.” (Jacob 2:19)

-“Money in the lives of Latter-day Saints should be used as a means of achieving eternal happiness. Careless and selfish uses cause us to live in financial bondage. We can’t afford to neglect personal and family involvement in our money management. God will open the windows of heaven to us in these matters if we will but live close to Him and keep His commandments.”  (One For the Money: Sep. 2007 Ensign; Elder Marvin J. Ashton (1915–94): https://www.lds.org/ensign/2007/09/one-for-the-money?lang=eng)

-“Seek not for riches, but for wisdom; and behold, the mysteries of God shall be unfolded unto you, and then shall you be made rich. Behold, he that hath eternal life is rich.” (Doctrine & Covenants 11:7)

-“So often it is the order of things that is fundamental in the Lord’s instructions to us. The Lord is not telling us that we should not be prosperous. This would be inconsistent with the many records we have of Him blessing His people with prosperity. But He is telling us that we should seek prosperity only after we have sought and found Him. Then, because our hearts are right, because we love Him first and foremost, we will choose to invest the riches we obtain in building His kingdom.” (L. Tom Perry  “United in Building the Kingdom of God” Conf. Report April 1987 https://www.lds.org/general-conference/1987/04/united-in-building-the-kingdom-of-god?lang=eng)

-“Are we our brothers’ keepers? In other words, are we responsible to look after the well-being of our neighbors as we seek to earn our daily bread? The Savior’s Golden Rule says we are. Satan says we are not.” (Dallin H. Oaks; Conf. Report 1986 “Brother’s Keeper” https://www.lds.org/general-conference/1986/10/brothers-keeper?lang=eng&clang=tam)

-“Every man seeking the interest of his neighbor…” (Doctrine & Covenants 82:19)

-“Followers of Christ have the moral responsibility of earning their livings and conducting their financial transactions in ways that are consistent with the principles of the gospel and the teachings of the Savior.” (Dallin H. Oaks; Conf. Report 1986 “Brother’s Keeper” https://www.lds.org/general-conference/1986/10/brothers-keeper?lang=eng&clang=tam)

-“Think of our brethren like unto yourselves, and be familiar with all and free with your substance, that they may be rich like unto you.”  (Jacob 2:17)

-“And remember in all things the poor and the needy, the sick and the afflicted, for he that doeth not these things, the same is not my disciple.” (Doctrine & Covenants 52:40)

-“The Lord has told us that if we are prepared, we shall not fear…personal and family preparedness is vital to our eternal welfare and happiness, and it is important to be strong financially, as well as spiritually, mentally, and physically.”

(Elder Franklin D. Richards; Conf. Report April 1979; “Personal and Family Preparedness” https://www.lds.org/general-conference/1979/04/personal-and-family-financial-preparedness?lang=eng)

-“Too often, people assume that they probably never will be injured, get sick, lose their jobs, or see their investments evaporate. To make matters worse, often people make purchases today based upon optimistic predictions of what they hope will happen tomorrow. The wise understand the importance of saving today for a rainy day tomorrow…” (Joseph B. Wirthlin; Conf. Report 2004 “Earthly Debts, Heavenly Debts” https://www.lds.org/general-conference/2004/04/earthly-debts-heavenly-debts?lang=eng&clang=tam)

-“There are many very good people who keep most of the Lord’s commandments with respect to the virtuous side of life, but who overlook His commandments in temporal things. They do not heed His warning to prepare for a possible future emergency, apparently feeling that in the midst of all this trouble ‘it won’t happen to us.’ To prepare for the future is part of God’s eternal plan, both spiritually and temporally. To protect ourselves against reversals and hardships is only good sense.” (Mark E. Peterson; Conf. Report 1981 “Blessings in Self-Reliance” https://www.lds.org/general-conference/1981/04/blessings-in-self-reliance?lang=eng&clang=tam)

-“It is most important to have sufficient medical, automobile, and homeowner’s insurance and an adequate life insurance program. Costs associated with illness, accident, and death may be so large that uninsured families can be financially burdened for many years.” (Marvin J. Ashton; Liahona Magazine April 2000 “Guide to Family Finance” https://www.lds.org/liahona/2000/04/guide-to-family-finance?lang=eng)

-“One final concern of reserve deficiency is the need to insure against our greatest potential loss. I think we all would agree that our ability to earn is our greatest asset. When the provider insures his life, he is insuring his future income for his family. As husbands, let us not force our wives into the marketplace to be both the provider and homemaker should our lives be cut short by premature death. We can increase their options by proper insurance planning. We would also urge each family to carry adequate health insurance. Medical costs are soaring, and trying to self-insure from personal savings is very risky. During inflation, medical costs increase faster than our savings accumulate.” (J. Richard Clarke Conf. Report 1980 “The Household of Faith” https://www.lds.org/general-conference/1980/10/the-household-of-faith?lang=eng&clang=tam)

-“God gave a natural instinct to the animals he created to preserve their surplus against a time of need. But man has developed the tendency to squander all that he harvests and to leave to chance or to others his satisfaction of future needs. This is contrary to divine law. Frugality is a principle of righteousness. In addition to our reserve of food, we should build a cash reserve.” (J. Richard Clarke Conf. Report 1980 “The Household of Faith” https://www.lds.org/general-conference/1980/10/the-household-of-faith?lang=eng&clang=tam)

-“Accumulate your basic food storage and emergency supplies in a systematic and orderly way. Avoid going into debt for these purposes. Beware of unwise food storage promotional schemes. Planting and harvesting a garden annually is helpful to the family in many ways, including the food budget. Eat nutritious foods and exercise appropriately to improve health, thus avoiding many medical costs.”  (Marvin J. Ashton; Liahona Magazine April 2000 “Guilde to Family Finance” https://www.lds.org/liahona/2000/04/guide-to-family-finance?lang=eng; also cited in Eternal Marriage Student Manual: Finances: 203; 115-23 ; https://www.lds.org/manual/eternal-marriage-student-manual/finances?lang=eng)

-“As we have been continuously counseled for more than 60 years, let us have some food set aside that would sustain us for a time in case of need.” (President Gordon B Hinckley: Conf. Report, “The Times in Which we Live” https://www.lds.org/general-conference/2001/10/the-times-in-which-we-live?lang=eng&clang=ase)

-“I have corresponded with several Church members who
sought to use something President Ezra Taft Benson was quoted
as saying as a basis for refusing to file an income tax return or to
pay income taxes. I have tried to persuade these persons that
their interpretation cannot be what President Benson intended,
because all who have held that sacred office, and all of the
General Authorities, have faithfully filed their income tax returns
and paid the taxes required by law.” (Dallin H. Oaks, Conf. Report: “Our Strengths can become our Weaknesses” Oct. 1994; https://www.lds.org/ensign/1994/10/our-strengths-can-become-our-downfall?lang=eng)

-“Save and invest a specific percentage of your income. Liquid savings available for emergencies should be sufficient to cover at least three months of all essential family obligations. Every LDS family should file honest and timely tax returns.”  (Marvin J. Ashton; Liahona Magazine April 2000 “Guilde to Family Finance” https://www.lds.org/liahona/2000/04/guide-to-family-finance?lang=eng)

-“A saint is an honorable citizen, knowing that the very country which provides opportunity and protection deserves support, including prompt payment of taxes and personal participation in its legal political process.” ((See D&C 134:5.); Russell M. Nelson; Conf. Report April 1990; “Thus Shall My Church Be Called”; https://www.lds.org/general-conference/1990/04/thus-shall-my-church-be-called?lang=eng)

-“Preserve and utilize your assets through appropriate tax and estate planning.” (Elder Franklin D. Richards; Conf. Report April 1979; “Personal and Family Preparedness” https://www.lds.org/general-conference/1979/04/personal-and-family-financial-preparedness?lang=eng)

-“Money management should take precedence over money productivity.” (One For the Money: Sep. 2007 Ensign; Elder Marvin J. Ashton (1915–94): https://www.lds.org/ensign/2007/09/one-for-the-money?lang=eng)

-“I am convinced that it is not the amount of money an individual earns that brings peace of mind as much as it is having control of his money. Money can be an obedient servant, but a harsh taskmaster.” (N. Eldon Tanner; First Presidency Message; https://www.lds.org/ensign/1982/06/constancy-amid-change?lang=eng; June 1982; from Conf. Report of Oct. 1979)

-“With all my heart…I plead with the Latter-day Saints to live honestly with the Lord in the payment of tithes and offerings…There has been laid upon the Church a tremendous responsibility. Tithing is the source of income for the Church to carry forward its mandated activities.” (Gordon B. Hinckley; Conf. Report April 1982 Tithing: An Opportunity to Prove Our Faithfulness; https://www.lds.org/general-conference/1982/04/tithing-an-opportunity-to-prove-our-faithfulness?lang=eng)

-“...tithing is a debt which everyone owes to the Lord for his use of the things that the Lord has made and given to him to use. It is a debt just as literally as the grocery bill, or a light bill, or any other duly incurred obligation. As a matter of fact, the Lord, to whom one owes tithing, is in a position of a preferred creditor. If there is not enough to pay all creditors, he should be paid first.” (Marion G. Romney: Conf. Report Jan. 1982 “The Blessings of an Honest Tithe” https://www.lds.org/new-era/1982/01/the-blessings-of-an-honest-tithe?lang=eng)

-“If there is any one thing that will bring peace and contentment into the human heart, and into the family, it is to live within our means. And if there is any one thing that is grinding and discouraging and disheartening, it is to have debts and obligations that one cannot meet.” (Heber J Grant, Gospel Standards, comp. G. Homer Durham (1941), 111. ; also cited in LDS Manual “Teachings of The Presidents of the Church: Heber J Grant ch 13 Principles of Financial Security”; https://www.lds.org/manual/teachings-heber-j-grant/chapter-13?lang=eng#4-35970_000_017)

-“The key to spending less than we earn is simple—it is called discipline. Whether early in life or late, we must all eventually learn to discipline ourselves, our appetites, and our economic desires. How blessed is he who learns to spend less than he earns and puts something away for a rainy day.” (N Eldon Tanner, Conf. Report Oct. 1979 “Constancy Amid Change” https://www.lds.org/general-conference/1979/10/constancy-amid-change?lang=eng&_r=1)

 

-“Every family must have a predetermined understanding of how much money will be available each month and the amount to be spent in each category of the family budget. Checkbooks facilitate family cash management and record keeping. Carefully record each check when written, and balance the checkbook with the monthly bank statement.” (Marvin J. Ashton; Liahona Magazine April 2000 “Guide to Family Finance” https://www.lds.org/liahona/2000/04/guide-to-family-finance?lang=eng)

-Marvin J. Ashton taught that, “Home ownership qualifies as an investment, not consumption. Buy the type of home your income will support. Improve the home and beautify the landscape throughout the period you occupy the premises so if you do sell it, you can use the accumulated equity and potential capital gain to acquire a home more suitable to family needs.” (Marvin J. Ashton; Liahona Magazine April 2000 “Guide to Family Finance” https://www.lds.org/liahona/2000/04/guide-to-family-finance?lang=eng)

-“…Latter-day Saints who ignore or avoid their creditors,” warned Marvin J. Ashton, “are entitled to feel the inner frustrations that such conduct merits, and they are not living as Latter-day Saints should! Bankruptcy should be avoided, except only under the most unique and irreversible circumstances, and then utilized only after prayerful thought and thorough legal and financial consultation.” (Marvin J. Ashton; Liahona Magazine April 2000 “Guide to Family Finance” https://www.lds.org/liahona/2000/04/guide-to-family-finance?lang=eng)

-“Keep your possessions free from debt. Get out of debt as fast as you can, and keep out of debt, for that is the way in which the promise of God will be fulfilled to the people of his Church, that they will become the richest of all people in the world.” (Joseph F. Smith; Teachings of Presidents of the Church: Joseph F. Smith, (2011), 163–72; Ch19 Thrift, the Foundation of Prosperity; https://www.lds.org/manual/teachings-joseph-f-smith/chapter-19?lang=eng)

-Heber J. Grant “From my earliest recollections, from the days of Brigham Young until now, I have listened to men standing in the pulpit…urging the people not to run into debt; and I believe that the great majority of all our troubles today is caused through the failure to carry out that counsel.” (Heber J Grant: Conference Report, Oct. 1921, 3; Also cited in Joseph B. Wirthlin Conf. Report 2004 “Earthly Debts, Heavenly Debts” https://www.lds.org/general-conference/2004/04/earthly-debts-heavenly-debts?lang=eng&clang=tam)

-“Borrow only what you must, at the lowest rate available, for the shortest time possible.” (J. Richard Clarke Conf. Report 1980 “The Household of Faith” https://www.lds.org/general-conference/1980/10/the-household-of-faith?lang=eng&clang=tam)

Buy consumer durables with cash (One For the Money: Sep. 2007 Ensign; Elder Marvin J. Ashton (1915–94): https://www.lds.org/ensign/2007/09/one-for-the-money?lang=eng)

-Marvin J. Ashton said, “Debt in itself is neither good nor bad. It is a financial tool with the potential of being either. Debt in business
may be used to increase productivity or aid in expansion. However, most individuals in debt are usually average people, but they are temporarily out of financial control. They are the victims of poor monetary habits and often have no
idea of the importance of proper money management. They misuse credit, especially credit cards, and don’t live within budgets or wise operational guidelines.” (Marvin J Ashton, Conf. Report Oct. 1981 “Give with Wisdom That They May Receive with Dignity” https://www.lds.org/general-conference/1981/10/give-with-wisdom-that-they-may-receive-with-dignity?lang=eng)

– N. Eldon Tanner said, “After…basics are met, we should by frugal management regularly save to create funds for investment. It has been my observation that few people have been successful with investments who have not first developed the habit of saving regularly. This requires discipline and discriminating judgment. There are many ways to invest. My only advice is to choose wisely your investment counselors. Be sure they merit your confidence by maintaining a successful investment.” (N Eldon Tanner, Conf. Report Oct. 1979 “Constancy Amid Change” https://www.lds.org/general-conference/1979/10/constancy-amid-change?lang=eng&_r=1)

“Every principle of the gospel, when lived, has a positive influence over your choice of an occupation and on what you will achieve…Living the gospel will give you a perspective and an inspiration that will see you successful however ordinary your work may be or however ordinary your life may seem to others. God bless the members of this Church, that you can be happy with who you are and where you are, that you can improve yourselves.” (Boyd K Paker; Conf. Report April 1982 “The Gospel- the Foundation of Our Career; https://www.lds.org/general-conference/1982/04/the-gospel-the-foundation-for-our-career?lang=eng)

-“Nothing destroys the individuality of a man, a woman, or a child as much as the failure to be self-reliant.” (Heber J Grant, Relief Society Magazine, Oct. 1937, 627; also cited in Teachings of Presidents of the Church: Heber J. Grant, (2011), 109–18 Ch12 Work and Self-Reliance; https://www.lds.org/manual/teachings-heber-j-grant/chapter-12?lang=eng#16-35970_000_016)

-“The practice of coveting and receiving unearned benefits has now become so fixed in our society that even men of wealth, possessing the means to produce more wealth, are expecting the government to guarantee them a profit. Elections often turn on what the candidates promise to do for voters from government funds. This practice, if universally accepted and implemented in any society, will make slaves of its citizens. We cannot afford to become wards of the government, even if we have a legal right to do so. It requires too great a sacrifice of self-respect and in political, temporal, and spiritual independence…We should strive to become self- reliant and not depend on others for our existence.”  (The Celestial Nature of Self-reliance; Marion G. Romney; Conf. Report 1982; https://www.lds.org/general-conference/1982/10/the-celestial-nature-of-self-reliance?lang=eng)

-J. Richard Clarke, “Let me repeat what has been taught from the beginning. Adam learned, as part of his first lesson by the Lord on economics, that the earth was to be subdued and dominion gained by sweat, by brain and brawn. The divine law of work shall never be repealed—for God established it. He has cursed idleness and commanded parents in Zion to teach their children to work. There is a high price for excellence, but the compensation and soul satisfaction are truly worth it. To work below our capabilities creates a deep hunger in ourselves and enormous waste in society. Our doctrine of eternal progression certainly encompasses our occupational progress. Each of us should be on a career path which will require us to stretch to our full potential.” (J Richard Clark; Conf. Report 1980; “The Household of Faith” https://www.lds.org/general-conference/1980/10/the-household-of-faith?lang=eng&clang=tam)

-“Our labor should be honest labor and quality labor. The only honorable way for each of us to share in the world’s wealth is to exchange our own goods and services for those produced by someone else. The Saints would be in demand everywhere and could command premium compensation if we would accept the challenge to set a Mormon standard of quality, unique because of its excellence. This is part of our religion.” (J Richard Clark; Conf. Report 1980; “The Household of Faith” https://www.lds.org/general-conference/1980/10/the-household-of-faith?lang=eng&clang=tam)

-“Complete as much formal, full-time education as possible. This includes the trade schools. This is money well invested. Use night school and correspondence classes to further prepare. Acquire some special skill or ability that could be used to avoid prolonged unemployment. In these days of worldwide heavy unemployment, we should not allow ourselves, when we are out of work, to sit back and wait for ‘our type of job’ if other honorable interim employment becomes available.” (One For the Money: Sep. 2007 Ensign; Elder Marvin J. Ashton (1915–94): https://www.lds.org/ensign/2007/09/one-for-the-money?lang=eng)

-“Followers of Christ have the moral responsibility of earning their livings and conducting their financial transactions in ways that are consistent with the principles of the gospel and the teachings of the Savior. Members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints should not be involved in employment or other activities upon which they cannot conscientiously ask the blessings of the Lord.” (Dallin H. Oaks; Conf. Report 1986 “Brother’s Keeper” https://www.lds.org/general-conference/1986/10/brothers-keeper?lang=eng&clang=tam)

-“Is it possible that our members are becoming part of a ‘conspiracy for mediocrity’ by being content with their present knowledge and skills?” (J. Richard Clarke Conf. Report 1980 “The Household of Faith” https://www.lds.org/general-conference/1980/10/the-household-of-faith?lang=eng&clang=tam)

-“…one might properly say, ‘What I am worth is what I am doing for other people.’”  (Franklin D. Richards “The Law of Abundance” in Conf. Report April 1971:https://www.lds.org/general-conference/1971/04/the-law-of-abundance?lang=eng)

-Marion G. Romney said, “Service is the very fiber of which an exalted life in the celestial kingdom is made…How can we give if there is nothing there? Food for the hungry cannot come from empty shelves. Money to assist the needy cannot come from an empty purse. Support and understanding cannot come from the emotionally starved. Teaching cannot come from the unlearned. And most important of all, spiritual guidance cannot come from the spiritually weak.” (The Celestial Nature of Self-reliance; Marion G. Romney; Conf. Report 1982; https://www.lds.org/general-conference/1982/10/the-celestial-nature-of-self-reliance?lang=eng)

-J. Richard Clarke counseled, “In order to balance our personal income and expenditures, we obviously reduce expenses or increase our earnings. Too often, however, people find it easier to adjust to a tighter budget than to find ways to generate additional income.” (J. Richard Clarke Conf. Report 1980 “The Household of Faith” https://www.lds.org/general-conference/1980/10/the-household-of-faith?lang=eng&clang=tam)

-“Consumption should never exceed our production. Economic freedom comes from the surpluses we create.” (J. Richard Clarke Conf. Report 1980 “The Household of Faith” https://www.lds.org/general-conference/1980/10/the-household-of-faith?lang=eng&clang=tam)

-“Unemployment and inflation can quickly wipe away hard-earned savings.” (James E Faust: The Blessings we receive as we meet the challenges of economic stress; Conf. Report Oct. 1982 https://www.lds.org/general-conference/1982/10/the-blessings-we-receive-as-we-meet-the-challenges-of-economic-stress?lang=eng)

-“Strive to understand and cope with existing inflation. Learn to see through the money illusion and recognize the real value of money. Most wage earners today have less purchasing power than they did [a few years ago]. To some degree inflation is probably going to be with us for a long time. Realize that you are living in a new era of higher prices and less abundant energy.”  (One For the Money: Sep. 2007 Ensign; Elder Marvin J. Ashton (1915–94): https://www.lds.org/ensign/2007/09/one-for-the-money?lang=eng)

-“When the lives of the people are in harmony with the Lord’s will, all of the essential factors that produce the blessings God deigns to give to his children seem to come into line. Love and harmony prevail. Even the weather, the climate, and the elements seem to respond. Peace and tranquility endure. Industry and progress mark the lives of the people.” (Conf. Report Oct. 1992 “The Lord Will Prosper the Righeous” Dean L. Larsen https://www.lds.org/general-conference/1992/10/the-lord-will-prosper-the-righteous?lang=eng)

-“It has always been a cardinal teaching with the Latter-day Saints, that a religion which has not the power to save people temporally and make them prosperous and happy here, cannot be depended upon to save them spiritually, to exalt them in the life to come.” (Joseph F. Smith; Teachings of Presidents of the Church: Joseph F. Smith, (2011), 163–72; Ch19 Thrift, the Foundation of Prosperity; https://www.lds.org/manual/teachings-joseph-f-smith/chapter-19?lang=eng)

-“We can’t afford to neglect personal and family involvement in our money management. God will open the windows of heaven to us in these matters if we will but live close to Him and keep His commandments.”  (One For the Money: Sep. 2007 Ensign; Elder Marvin J. Ashton (1915–94): https://www.lds.org/ensign/2007/09/one-for-the-money?lang=eng)

-“The Lord has demonstrated throughout the generations that when the inhabitants of the earth remember him and are obedient to his direction, he will bless them not only with spiritual blessings, but with material abundance as well. The scriptures contain many evidences of the Lord’s willingness to prosper his people with the riches of the earth when they demonstrate that they will use this abundance prudently, with humility and charity, always acknowledging the source of their blessings.” (Conf. Report Oct. 1992 “The Lord Will Prosper the Righeous” Dean L. Larsen https://www.lds.org/general-conference/1992/10/the-lord-will-prosper-the-righteous?lang=eng) (*Another insight about this is that it could be a national blessing which our whole nation is overall wicked hence even many of the righteous are not getting blessed financially as much as they otherwise would be.)

-“Get out of debt and keep out of debt, and then you will be financially as well as spiritually free.” (Joseph F. Smith; Teachings of Presidents of the Church: Joseph F. Smith, (2011), 163–72; Ch19 Thrift, the Foundation of Prosperity; https://www.lds.org/manual/teachings-joseph-f-smith/chapter-19?lang=eng)

– “Let us remember that it is against the will of God that any one of us should be in bondage—in any way —neither to sin nor to addiction nor to debt. ‘Ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free’ (John 8:32), He declared—free from sin, free from addiction of all kinds, and free from the slavery of debt. His truth, which is His gospel, will make us free—if we obey Him!”  (Mark E. Peterson; Conf. Report 1981 “Blessings in Self-Reliance” https://www.lds.org/general-conference/1981/04/blessings-in-self-reliance?lang=eng&clang=tam)

– “It is something to supply clothing to the scantily clad, to furnish ample food to those whose table is thinly spread, to give activity to those who are fighting desperately the despair that comes from enforced idleness, but after all is said and done, the greatest blessings that will accrue from the Church [welfare program] are spiritual. Outwardly, every act seems to be directed toward the physical: re-making of dresses and suits of clothes, canning fruits and vegetables, storing foodstuffs, choosing of fertile fields for settlement—all seem strictly temporal, but permeating all these acts, inspiring and sanctifying them, is the element of spirituality.” (David O. McKay Conference Report, Oct. 1936, p. 103; also cited in The Celestial Nature of Self-reliance; Marion G. Romney; Conf. Report 1982; https://www.lds.org/general-conference/1982/10/the-celestial-nature-of-self-reliance?lang=eng )

-N. Eldon Tanner warned that, “Overindulgence and poor money management place a heavy strain on marriage relationships. Most marital problems, it seems, originate from economic roots—either insufficient income to sustain the family or mismanagement of the income as earned.” Financial obedience eliminates much of the stress of marriage and facilitates unity within marriages and families. (N Eldon Tanner, Conference Report, Oct. 1979, 119–20; or Ensign, Nov. 1979, 81; also cited in                          Marriage and Family Relations Instructor’s Manual, (2000), 35–40; LESSON 8: MANAGING FAMILY FINANCES ; https://www.lds.org/manual/marriage-and-family-relations-instructors-manual/part-a-strengthening-marriages/lesson-8-managing-family-finances?lang=eng)

-“…we can tell whether or not we put the kingdom of God first by looking at how we treat our brothers and sisters in the Church. Is there a special bond uniting us? Is there an absence of envy and backbiting? Do we rejoice in the success of a brother or sister as much as in our own? Do we share our substance so that all may be rich like unto us? Ultimately, are we our brothers’ and sisters’ keepers? May each of us accept the challenge to seek the kingdom of God first, before and above all else, and by so doing draw closer together as a people, until we are all of one heart and one mind…” (L Tom Perry, United in Building the Kingdom of God; April 1987 Conf. Report https://www.lds.org/general-conference/1987/04/united-in-building-the-kingdom-of-god?lang=eng)

-“But learn that he who doeth the works of righteousness shall receive his reward, even peace in this world, and eternal life in the world to come.” (Doctrine and Covenants 59:23)

-“The payment of tithing is a commandment, a
commandment with a promise. If we obey this commandment, we are promised
that we will ‘prosper in the land.’ This prosperity consists of more than material
goods—it may include enjoying good health and vigor of mind. It includes family
solidarity and spiritual increase. I hope those of you presently paying your full tithe
will seek the faith and strength to do so. As you discharge this obligation to your Maker, you will find great, great happiness, the like of which is known only by those who are faithful to this commandment.” (N. Eldon Tanner; The Gospel and the Productive Life Teacher Manual Religion 150, (2004), 15–20; https://www.lds.org/manual/the-gospel-and-the-productive-life-teacher-manual-religion-150/managing-financial-resources-wisely?lang=eng)

-“If there is any one thing that will bring peace and contentment into the human heart, and into the family, it is to live within our means. And if there is any one thing that is grinding and discouraging and disheartening, it is to have debts and obligations that one cannot meet.” (LDS Manual “Teachings of The Presidents of the Church: Heber J Grant ch 13 Principles of Financial Security”; https://www.lds.org/manual/teachings-heber-j-grant/chapter-13?lang=eng#4-35970_000_017)

-“Obedience to God’s commandments is the foundation for a happy life. Surely we will be blessed with the gifts of heaven for our obedience. Failure to pay tithing by those who know the principle can lead to heartache in this life and perhaps sorrow in the next.” (Joseph B. Wirthlin; Conf. Report 2004 “Earthly Debts, Heavenly Debts” https://www.lds.org/general-conference/2004/04/earthly-debts-heavenly-debts?lang=eng&clang=tam)

-“One of the greatest lessons I have learned, …is that people who pay their tithing in both difficult times and good times get along better. They simply have fewer problems; there are fewer family problems and fewer financial problems. Their outlook is more positive, their ability to do and function is increased, and they prosper spiritually as well as temporally.” (James E Faust;  Aug. 1984 Doing the best things in the Worst Times; https://www.lds.org/ensign/1984/08/doing-the-best-things-in-the-worst-times?lang=eng)

-“One of life’s paradoxes is that a person who approaches everything with a what’s-in-it-for-me attitude may acquire money, property, and land, but in the end will lose the fulfillment and the happiness that a person enjoys who shares his talents and gifts generously with others.” (James E Faust; Conf. Report Oct. 2002 What’s In It For Me? https://www.lds.org/general-conference/2002/10/whats-in-it-for-me?lang=eng)

-“There are many ways in which the Lord can bless us beyond the riches of the world. There is the great boon of health. The Lord has promised that he will rebuke the devourer for our sakes. Malachi speaks of the fruits of our ground. May not that rebuke of the devourer apply to various of our personal efforts and concerns? There is the great blessing of wisdom, of knowledge, even hidden treasures of knowledge. We are promised that ours shall be a delightsome land if we will walk in obedience to this law.” (Gordon B. Hinckley; Conf. Report April 1982 Tithing: An Opportunity to Prove Our Faithfulness; https://www.lds.org/general-conference/1982/04/tithing-an-opportunity-to-prove-our-faithfulness?lang=eng)

-“The purpose of estate planning is to permit us to enjoy our property during life and then pass the unused portion to whomever we choose, with the least possible shrinkage in value. With wise planning, we can accomplish the following desirable ends: satisfy our personal needs and desires and those of our family, ensure that our property is left to the intended beneficiaries, designate someone to care for minor children, reduce family contentions, reduce the cost of transferring property upon death, and minimize income, gift, estate, and inheritance taxes.” (Steven J. Dixon, Ensign 1983 “Planning Ahead: The Importance of Wills and Trusts” https://www.lds.org/ensign/1983/06/planning-ahead-the-importance-of-wills-and-trusts?lang=eng&clang=mya)

Some talks:

  1. Constancy Amid Change by N. Eldon Tanner
2. Guide to Family Finance by Marvin J. Ashton
3. The Use & Abuse of Blessings by Brigham Young
4. Thrift: The Foundation of Prosperity by Joseph F. Smith 5. The Household of Faith by J. Richard Clarke
6. Earthly Debts, Heavenly Debts by Joseph Wirthlin
7. Personal and Family Financial Preparedness by Franklin D. Richards
8. Providing For Our Needs by M. Russell Ballard
9. It’s No Fun Being Poor by Marvin J. Ashton
10. Blessings in Self-Reliance by Mark E. Peterson
11. The Celestial Nature of Self-Reliance by Marion G. Romney
12. The Lord Will Prosper the Righteous by Dean L. Larsen 13. The Times in Which We Live by Gordon B. Hinckley
  2. Doing the Best Things in the Worst of Times by James E. Faust
15. Greed, Selfishness, and Overindulgence by Joe Christensen
  3. Tithing: An Opportunity to Prove Our Faithfulness by Gordon B. Hinckley
17. What’s In It For Me? by James E. Faust
18. Brother’s Keeper by Dallin H. Oaks
  4. The Law of Abundance by Franklin D. Richards
20. The Gospel: The Foundation of Our Career by Boyd K. Packer
21. This is No Harm by Marvin J. Ashton
22. The Father’s Duty to Foster the Welfare of His Family by H. Burke Peterson
23. The Perfect Law of Liberty by Marion G. Romney
24. But Be Ye Doers of the Word by L. Tom Perry
25. Watch, That Ye May Be Ready by Harold B. Lee
  5. United In Building the Kingdom of God by L.Tom Perry 27. As a Man Soweth by L. Tom Perry
28. The Tragic Cycle by Marion D. Romney
29. “Beware Lest Thou Forget the Lord” by Dean L. Larsen 30. “For Whatsoever a Man Soweth, That Shall He Also Reap” by L. Tom Perry
  6. Becoming Self-Reliant by L. Tom Perry
  7. “Give With Wisdom That Ye May Receive With Dignity” by Marvin J. Ashton
33. The Blessings We Receive as We Meet the Challenges of Economic Stress by James E. Faust
  8. Guiding Principles of Personal and Family Welfare by Thomas S. Monson

 

-having a wife work as well as the man can make your taxes go up, and cost of daycare for the children, etc.  go up

 

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